People don't remember me. That's me, though I have shorter hair now.

It sounds like an insecurity complex, but I swear that it's true. One example (of many): the wife of a former colleague of my husband's spent two evenings sitting across from me at a restaurant, conversed with me at an office party and even invited me to her wedding. My husband and I later attended a party at her home, and when I saw her I walked right up and said, "Thanks so much for inviting us!"

She smiled, held out her hand and said, "Hi, I'm Tahnee. What's your name?"

My neighbor -- a really lovely woman -- and I were talking the other day, and she mentioned that she suffers from the same forget-ability. It's hard for me to understand how anyone could forget her, and I don't think I'm flattering myself when I say that she seemed surprised that people would forget me. But it's true. It happens more often than I'd like.

Not that I let it get to me, not too much, anyway. I really think it's Tahnee's loss that she can't remember the very nice conversations we shared. But I'll admit that her indifference made me loathe to spend any more time with her and her husband.

Now, imagine how your donor feels when you misspell her name…when you reference a gift amount he never gave…when you call, email or send mail when he expressly asked you not to…when you show that you have no idea who they are or why they gave to you in the first place.

Frankly, it's insulting. And no one wants to spend time or money with someone who insults them.

Know your donors. Show them that you know who they are, that you understand why they give and that you share their passion for solving the problem your organization is trying to solve. Let them know that you rely on and appreciate their commitment to your cause.

Never let them feel forgettable.

How are you making your donors feel like you know who they are? How do you show them they're valued? Share your ideas in the comment section!